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Frequently Asked Questions from TANO CABLE

Faq
FAQ
Q
When I want customized cable or wires, how to do?
A
We have professional equipment, technicians skilled employees, OEM& customized service are welcomed. Drawings or samples are required.
Q
What about the lead time and shipping method?
A
Goods can be delivered by air or by sea. International Express as FEDEX, UPS, DHL, TNT. Generally speaking, 10-20 days are required.
Q
Can you accept OEM order?
A
Welcome to send your specified product design and package design to us for your order. We can accept to print your logo and design the package according to your specific requirement.
Q
Why are some coaxial cables microphonic?
A
The center conductor, insulation and shield of a coaxial cable form a capacitor; and, as many a microphone manufacturer will tell you, when the plates of a capacitor are deflected, a voltage is generated. (This is the basis of the condenser microphone!) Similarly, when the plates (conductor and shield) of our “cable-capacitor” are deflected (for instance, by stepping on it or allowing it to strike a hard floor), a voltage is also generated. Unfortunately, this voltage generally pops out of the amplifier as a distinct “whap,” and can be very hard on ears and loudspeakers alike. Effects of this type are called triboelectric noise.
Q
How can instrument cable noise be reduced?
A
The electrostatic shield’s charge-draining properties help greatly to diminish triboelectric effects. Triboelectric impact noise is also reduced by decreasing the capacitance of the cable with thicker and softer insulation because the deflection of the conductor is proportionally reduced. This is the main reason that the single-conductor coaxial configuration remains superior to the“twisted pair” for high-impedance uses—it allows thicker insulation for a given overall diameter. Triboelectric effects are accentuated by high source impedances, and are at their worst when the source is an open circuit—for instance, a cable plugged into an amplifier with no instrument at the sending end. Testing for this type of noise requires termination of the cable with a shielded resistance to simulate the source impedance of a real instrument.
Q
What does the shield do?
A
The copper shield of a coaxial cable acts as the return conductor for the signal current and as a barrier to prevent interference from reaching the “hot” center conductor. Unwanted types of interference encountered and blocked with varying degrees of success by cable shielding include radio frequency (RFI) (CB and AM radio), electromagnetic (EMI) (power transformers) and electrostatic (ESI) (SCR dimmers, relays, fluorescent lights).
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